womenofgraphicdesign:

Nike “Swoosh” logo, designed by Carolyn Davidson in 1971. Davidson was studying graphic design at Portland State University when she came up with the famous mark.

womenofgraphicdesign:

Nike “Swoosh” logo, designed by Carolyn Davidson in 1971. Davidson was studying graphic design at Portland State University when she came up with the famous mark.

classicpenguin:

This is too fun not to share.
We recently received a letter from a perceptive Classics reader noting a possible error in our current edition of Jane Eyre. Here’s the passage in question — a John Reed tirade:

"Where the dickens is she?," he continued. "Lizzy? Georgy (calling to his sisters) Joan is not here: tell mamma she is run out into the rain — bad animal!"

Joan? Joan Eyre? Surely not. Fascinated, we took this query Stevie Davies, editor of our current edition and resident Bronte expert, who gave us this enlightening answer.

Delighted to be asked, and it’s a good question, asked by a keen-eyed reader, because it picks up some of the meticulous verbal nuancing and class inflection that make Jane Eyre so authentic a social document. John Reed is calling Jane by a version of her name he considers proper to the lower ranks. This goes right back - Shakespeare: ‘Greasy Joan doth keel the pots.’

Oh, the ever-so-subtle art of the Victorian dis. John Reed is such a toad. Can someone please prepare a list of low-rent versions of common names so we can bring these insults back?

classicpenguin:

This is too fun not to share.

We recently received a letter from a perceptive Classics reader noting a possible error in our current edition of Jane Eyre. Here’s the passage in question — a John Reed tirade:

"Where the dickens is she?," he continued. "Lizzy? Georgy (calling to his sisters) Joan is not here: tell mamma she is run out into the rain — bad animal!"

Joan? Joan Eyre? Surely not. Fascinated, we took this query Stevie Davies, editor of our current edition and resident Bronte expert, who gave us this enlightening answer.

Delighted to be asked, and it’s a good question, asked by a keen-eyed reader, because it picks up some of the meticulous verbal nuancing and class inflection that make Jane Eyre so authentic a social document. John Reed is calling Jane by a version of her name he considers proper to the lower ranks. This goes right back - Shakespeare: ‘Greasy Joan doth keel the pots.’

Oh, the ever-so-subtle art of the Victorian dis. John Reed is such a toad. Can someone please prepare a list of low-rent versions of common names so we can bring these insults back?

movieposteroftheday:

Official poster for the 2014 Cannes Film Festival
Designers: Herve Chigioni and Gilles Frappier
Poster source: IMPAwards

movieposteroftheday:

Official poster for the 2014 Cannes Film Festival

Designers: Herve Chigioni and Gilles Frappier

Poster source: IMPAwards

omnia-est-vanitas:

Why does it feel like 80% of social justice is congratulating oneself on being so enlightened and looking down on anyone who doesn’t fit a certain brand of SJ orthodoxy?

I need a fucking break from this movement, it’s too narcissistic for even me.

spaceexp:

Relative size of stars

spaceexp:

Relative size of stars

Kid in my class just admitted his love for cy twombly, fitzgerald, and woody allen in a single, revealing sentence. I am going to hit him in the dick.