likeafieldmouse:

Tracey Emin - Exorcism of the Last Painting I Ever Made (1996)
“Tracey Emin lived in a locked room in a gallery for fourteen days, with nothing but a lot of empty canvases and art materials, in an attempt to reconcile herself with paintings. Viewed through a series of wide-angle lenses embedded in the walls, Emin could be watched, stark naked, shaking off her painting demons. Starting by making images like the artists she admired (i.e. Egon Schiele, Edvard Munch, Yves Klein), Emin’s two-week art-therapy session resulted in a massive outpouring of autobiographical images, and the discovery of a style all her own. The room was extracted in its entirety, and now exists as an installation work.”
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Phase One P 45
  • 50
likeafieldmouse:

Tracey Emin - Exorcism of the Last Painting I Ever Made (1996)
“Tracey Emin lived in a locked room in a gallery for fourteen days, with nothing but a lot of empty canvases and art materials, in an attempt to reconcile herself with paintings. Viewed through a series of wide-angle lenses embedded in the walls, Emin could be watched, stark naked, shaking off her painting demons. Starting by making images like the artists she admired (i.e. Egon Schiele, Edvard Munch, Yves Klein), Emin’s two-week art-therapy session resulted in a massive outpouring of autobiographical images, and the discovery of a style all her own. The room was extracted in its entirety, and now exists as an installation work.”
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Phase One P 45
  • 50
likeafieldmouse:

Tracey Emin - Exorcism of the Last Painting I Ever Made (1996)
“Tracey Emin lived in a locked room in a gallery for fourteen days, with nothing but a lot of empty canvases and art materials, in an attempt to reconcile herself with paintings. Viewed through a series of wide-angle lenses embedded in the walls, Emin could be watched, stark naked, shaking off her painting demons. Starting by making images like the artists she admired (i.e. Egon Schiele, Edvard Munch, Yves Klein), Emin’s two-week art-therapy session resulted in a massive outpouring of autobiographical images, and the discovery of a style all her own. The room was extracted in its entirety, and now exists as an installation work.”
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Phase One P 45
  • 50

likeafieldmouse:

Tracey Emin - Exorcism of the Last Painting I Ever Made (1996)

Tracey Emin lived in a locked room in a gallery for fourteen days, with nothing but a lot of empty canvases and art materials, in an attempt to reconcile herself with paintings. Viewed through a series of wide-angle lenses embedded in the walls, Emin could be watched, stark naked, shaking off her painting demons. Starting by making images like the artists she admired (i.e. Egon Schiele, Edvard Munch, Yves Klein), Emin’s two-week art-therapy session resulted in a massive outpouring of autobiographical images, and the discovery of a style all her own. The room was extracted in its entirety, and now exists as an installation work.”

@katelynmaddock @colegenevieve y’all know what I’m about. #sandwich

@katelynmaddock @colegenevieve y’all know what I’m about. #sandwich

Getting ready for the new MODA exhibit, “Inspiring Beauty: 50 years of the Ebony Fashion Fair.”

Getting ready for the new MODA exhibit, “Inspiring Beauty: 50 years of the Ebony Fashion Fair.”

brumpicts:

Gilbert et George.
White Cube.
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • SONY SLT-A35
  • 400
  • f/9
  • 1/500th
  • 35mm

brumpicts:

Gilbert et George.

White Cube.

Theaster Gates’s lecture, entitled My Labor is My Protest / Artist Agency in the Re-Creation of Space, explores his work in cultural development -the arts-based revitalization of under-resourced neighborhoods. Gates uses sculpture, performance art, installations and urban interventions to explore ways in which artists and cultural producers can be proactively involved in community renewal, particularly in poor, black, urban neighborhoods.

artlog:

Jenny Holzer’s ‘Dust Paintings’ at Cheim & Read
'Dust Paintings,' the exhibition of a set of recent works by American neo-conceptual artist Jenny Holzer currently on display at Cheim & Read, represents a continuation of themes and media that the artist has been concerned and involved with for years now, namely her preoccupation - a self-admitted personal interest - with the operations, consequences, and documentation of the ongoing 'War on Terror,' which perhaps not coincidentally has its beginnings in the early 2000s, roughly coinciding with a decision to utilize the texts of others as opposed to her own for the first time, and a notable return to painting.
Holzer, the first woman to represent the United States at the Venice Biennale, for winning the Golden Lion there, and for being a recipient of a variety of other major prizes and, of course, commissions, had been widely known - increasingly so - from the 70s to the 90s and beyond, for her use of LED screens and later, projections, to display text in public settings.  By many accounts, Holzer moved to text as her main medium of choice from painting while a student at the Whitney ISP program, and never looked back.  The subject matter of the texts she came up with and used varied widely, from project to project, or series to series.
Since 2004, however, Holzer has arguably been reaching back to, or at least referencing her early practice as an abstract painter, to accommodate her work with declassified and redacted documents detailing government and military activities relating to and surrounding the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq.

X Conclusion, 2014, Oil on linen, 80 x 62 x 1 1/2 in.  (203.2 x 157.5 x 3.8 cm).  Photo credit:  © Jenny Holzer, member Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY.  Courtesy Cheim & Read, New York.
While previous exhibitions in New York of hers such as the thought-provokingly-titled ‘Archive’ from mid-2006 had her silkscreening on linen copies of text documents, the works in ‘Dust Paintings’ share more similarities with the even more recent ‘Endgame,’ where Holzer painted oil on linen copies of these intensely analyzed and manipulated documents.

CONCLUSION, 2014, Oil on linen, 24 x 18 1/4 x 1 1/2 in.  (61 x 46.4 x 3.8 cm).  Photo credit:  © Jenny Holzer, member Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY.  Courtesy Cheim & Read, New York.
Interestingly, some portion of the works on display at both exhibitions past and present evoke the late modern abstract sylistic characteristics of Malevich’s Suprematism and the like, with basic and gradient-colored rectangles filling in as tools of redaction against white backgrounds, selectively revealing words, and fragments of, or whole sentences every bit as provocative as in any of Holzer’s past work.

PRESENTLY IN THE UNITED STATES, 2014, Oil on linen, 80 x 62 x 1 1/2 in.  (203.2 x 157.5 x 3.8 cm).  Photo credit:  © Jenny Holzer, member Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY.  Courtesy Cheim & Read, New York.
While the Suprematist-inspired works tend to be based on past intelligence reports, most of the other works are taken from the contents of a U.S. Army criminal investigation report on the death of an Afghan captive, and resemble hand-written letters and doodles whose deteriorating condition may soon make them incomprehensible.

cold water, 2013, Oil on linen, 58 x 44 x 1 1/2 in. (147.3 x 111.8 x 3.8 cm).  Photo credit:  © Jenny Holzer, member Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY.  Courtesy Cheim & Read, New York.
Although the medium has changed from LED and projection, and - something is to be said - away from technology towards the plastic arts, and the subject matter from a social context and contemporary everyday living to the specific situation of the ‘War on Terror,’ ‘Dust Paintings’ retains an ambiguous yet provocative power in utilizing text, language, and words that has been consistent through and remains characteristic of Holzer’s art.
Jenny Holzer:  Dust Paintings will be on display at Cheim & Read at 547 West 25th Street, New York, NY 10001 through October 25th, 2014.
- Arthur Ivan Bravo
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Canon EOS 5D Mark II
  • 100
  • f/8
  • 1/125th
  • 50mm
artlog:

Jenny Holzer’s ‘Dust Paintings’ at Cheim & Read
'Dust Paintings,' the exhibition of a set of recent works by American neo-conceptual artist Jenny Holzer currently on display at Cheim & Read, represents a continuation of themes and media that the artist has been concerned and involved with for years now, namely her preoccupation - a self-admitted personal interest - with the operations, consequences, and documentation of the ongoing 'War on Terror,' which perhaps not coincidentally has its beginnings in the early 2000s, roughly coinciding with a decision to utilize the texts of others as opposed to her own for the first time, and a notable return to painting.
Holzer, the first woman to represent the United States at the Venice Biennale, for winning the Golden Lion there, and for being a recipient of a variety of other major prizes and, of course, commissions, had been widely known - increasingly so - from the 70s to the 90s and beyond, for her use of LED screens and later, projections, to display text in public settings.  By many accounts, Holzer moved to text as her main medium of choice from painting while a student at the Whitney ISP program, and never looked back.  The subject matter of the texts she came up with and used varied widely, from project to project, or series to series.
Since 2004, however, Holzer has arguably been reaching back to, or at least referencing her early practice as an abstract painter, to accommodate her work with declassified and redacted documents detailing government and military activities relating to and surrounding the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq.

X Conclusion, 2014, Oil on linen, 80 x 62 x 1 1/2 in.  (203.2 x 157.5 x 3.8 cm).  Photo credit:  © Jenny Holzer, member Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY.  Courtesy Cheim & Read, New York.
While previous exhibitions in New York of hers such as the thought-provokingly-titled ‘Archive’ from mid-2006 had her silkscreening on linen copies of text documents, the works in ‘Dust Paintings’ share more similarities with the even more recent ‘Endgame,’ where Holzer painted oil on linen copies of these intensely analyzed and manipulated documents.

CONCLUSION, 2014, Oil on linen, 24 x 18 1/4 x 1 1/2 in.  (61 x 46.4 x 3.8 cm).  Photo credit:  © Jenny Holzer, member Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY.  Courtesy Cheim & Read, New York.
Interestingly, some portion of the works on display at both exhibitions past and present evoke the late modern abstract sylistic characteristics of Malevich’s Suprematism and the like, with basic and gradient-colored rectangles filling in as tools of redaction against white backgrounds, selectively revealing words, and fragments of, or whole sentences every bit as provocative as in any of Holzer’s past work.

PRESENTLY IN THE UNITED STATES, 2014, Oil on linen, 80 x 62 x 1 1/2 in.  (203.2 x 157.5 x 3.8 cm).  Photo credit:  © Jenny Holzer, member Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY.  Courtesy Cheim & Read, New York.
While the Suprematist-inspired works tend to be based on past intelligence reports, most of the other works are taken from the contents of a U.S. Army criminal investigation report on the death of an Afghan captive, and resemble hand-written letters and doodles whose deteriorating condition may soon make them incomprehensible.

cold water, 2013, Oil on linen, 58 x 44 x 1 1/2 in. (147.3 x 111.8 x 3.8 cm).  Photo credit:  © Jenny Holzer, member Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY.  Courtesy Cheim & Read, New York.
Although the medium has changed from LED and projection, and - something is to be said - away from technology towards the plastic arts, and the subject matter from a social context and contemporary everyday living to the specific situation of the ‘War on Terror,’ ‘Dust Paintings’ retains an ambiguous yet provocative power in utilizing text, language, and words that has been consistent through and remains characteristic of Holzer’s art.
Jenny Holzer:  Dust Paintings will be on display at Cheim & Read at 547 West 25th Street, New York, NY 10001 through October 25th, 2014.
- Arthur Ivan Bravo
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Canon EOS 5D Mark II
  • 100
  • f/11
  • 1/125th
  • 50mm
artlog:

Jenny Holzer’s ‘Dust Paintings’ at Cheim & Read
'Dust Paintings,' the exhibition of a set of recent works by American neo-conceptual artist Jenny Holzer currently on display at Cheim & Read, represents a continuation of themes and media that the artist has been concerned and involved with for years now, namely her preoccupation - a self-admitted personal interest - with the operations, consequences, and documentation of the ongoing 'War on Terror,' which perhaps not coincidentally has its beginnings in the early 2000s, roughly coinciding with a decision to utilize the texts of others as opposed to her own for the first time, and a notable return to painting.
Holzer, the first woman to represent the United States at the Venice Biennale, for winning the Golden Lion there, and for being a recipient of a variety of other major prizes and, of course, commissions, had been widely known - increasingly so - from the 70s to the 90s and beyond, for her use of LED screens and later, projections, to display text in public settings.  By many accounts, Holzer moved to text as her main medium of choice from painting while a student at the Whitney ISP program, and never looked back.  The subject matter of the texts she came up with and used varied widely, from project to project, or series to series.
Since 2004, however, Holzer has arguably been reaching back to, or at least referencing her early practice as an abstract painter, to accommodate her work with declassified and redacted documents detailing government and military activities relating to and surrounding the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq.

X Conclusion, 2014, Oil on linen, 80 x 62 x 1 1/2 in.  (203.2 x 157.5 x 3.8 cm).  Photo credit:  © Jenny Holzer, member Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY.  Courtesy Cheim & Read, New York.
While previous exhibitions in New York of hers such as the thought-provokingly-titled ‘Archive’ from mid-2006 had her silkscreening on linen copies of text documents, the works in ‘Dust Paintings’ share more similarities with the even more recent ‘Endgame,’ where Holzer painted oil on linen copies of these intensely analyzed and manipulated documents.

CONCLUSION, 2014, Oil on linen, 24 x 18 1/4 x 1 1/2 in.  (61 x 46.4 x 3.8 cm).  Photo credit:  © Jenny Holzer, member Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY.  Courtesy Cheim & Read, New York.
Interestingly, some portion of the works on display at both exhibitions past and present evoke the late modern abstract sylistic characteristics of Malevich’s Suprematism and the like, with basic and gradient-colored rectangles filling in as tools of redaction against white backgrounds, selectively revealing words, and fragments of, or whole sentences every bit as provocative as in any of Holzer’s past work.

PRESENTLY IN THE UNITED STATES, 2014, Oil on linen, 80 x 62 x 1 1/2 in.  (203.2 x 157.5 x 3.8 cm).  Photo credit:  © Jenny Holzer, member Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY.  Courtesy Cheim & Read, New York.
While the Suprematist-inspired works tend to be based on past intelligence reports, most of the other works are taken from the contents of a U.S. Army criminal investigation report on the death of an Afghan captive, and resemble hand-written letters and doodles whose deteriorating condition may soon make them incomprehensible.

cold water, 2013, Oil on linen, 58 x 44 x 1 1/2 in. (147.3 x 111.8 x 3.8 cm).  Photo credit:  © Jenny Holzer, member Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY.  Courtesy Cheim & Read, New York.
Although the medium has changed from LED and projection, and - something is to be said - away from technology towards the plastic arts, and the subject matter from a social context and contemporary everyday living to the specific situation of the ‘War on Terror,’ ‘Dust Paintings’ retains an ambiguous yet provocative power in utilizing text, language, and words that has been consistent through and remains characteristic of Holzer’s art.
Jenny Holzer:  Dust Paintings will be on display at Cheim & Read at 547 West 25th Street, New York, NY 10001 through October 25th, 2014.
- Arthur Ivan Bravo
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Canon EOS-1Ds Mark II
  • 100
  • f/8
  • 1/125th
  • 50mm
artlog:

Jenny Holzer’s ‘Dust Paintings’ at Cheim & Read
'Dust Paintings,' the exhibition of a set of recent works by American neo-conceptual artist Jenny Holzer currently on display at Cheim & Read, represents a continuation of themes and media that the artist has been concerned and involved with for years now, namely her preoccupation - a self-admitted personal interest - with the operations, consequences, and documentation of the ongoing 'War on Terror,' which perhaps not coincidentally has its beginnings in the early 2000s, roughly coinciding with a decision to utilize the texts of others as opposed to her own for the first time, and a notable return to painting.
Holzer, the first woman to represent the United States at the Venice Biennale, for winning the Golden Lion there, and for being a recipient of a variety of other major prizes and, of course, commissions, had been widely known - increasingly so - from the 70s to the 90s and beyond, for her use of LED screens and later, projections, to display text in public settings.  By many accounts, Holzer moved to text as her main medium of choice from painting while a student at the Whitney ISP program, and never looked back.  The subject matter of the texts she came up with and used varied widely, from project to project, or series to series.
Since 2004, however, Holzer has arguably been reaching back to, or at least referencing her early practice as an abstract painter, to accommodate her work with declassified and redacted documents detailing government and military activities relating to and surrounding the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq.

X Conclusion, 2014, Oil on linen, 80 x 62 x 1 1/2 in.  (203.2 x 157.5 x 3.8 cm).  Photo credit:  © Jenny Holzer, member Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY.  Courtesy Cheim & Read, New York.
While previous exhibitions in New York of hers such as the thought-provokingly-titled ‘Archive’ from mid-2006 had her silkscreening on linen copies of text documents, the works in ‘Dust Paintings’ share more similarities with the even more recent ‘Endgame,’ where Holzer painted oil on linen copies of these intensely analyzed and manipulated documents.

CONCLUSION, 2014, Oil on linen, 24 x 18 1/4 x 1 1/2 in.  (61 x 46.4 x 3.8 cm).  Photo credit:  © Jenny Holzer, member Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY.  Courtesy Cheim & Read, New York.
Interestingly, some portion of the works on display at both exhibitions past and present evoke the late modern abstract sylistic characteristics of Malevich’s Suprematism and the like, with basic and gradient-colored rectangles filling in as tools of redaction against white backgrounds, selectively revealing words, and fragments of, or whole sentences every bit as provocative as in any of Holzer’s past work.

PRESENTLY IN THE UNITED STATES, 2014, Oil on linen, 80 x 62 x 1 1/2 in.  (203.2 x 157.5 x 3.8 cm).  Photo credit:  © Jenny Holzer, member Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY.  Courtesy Cheim & Read, New York.
While the Suprematist-inspired works tend to be based on past intelligence reports, most of the other works are taken from the contents of a U.S. Army criminal investigation report on the death of an Afghan captive, and resemble hand-written letters and doodles whose deteriorating condition may soon make them incomprehensible.

cold water, 2013, Oil on linen, 58 x 44 x 1 1/2 in. (147.3 x 111.8 x 3.8 cm).  Photo credit:  © Jenny Holzer, member Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY.  Courtesy Cheim & Read, New York.
Although the medium has changed from LED and projection, and - something is to be said - away from technology towards the plastic arts, and the subject matter from a social context and contemporary everyday living to the specific situation of the ‘War on Terror,’ ‘Dust Paintings’ retains an ambiguous yet provocative power in utilizing text, language, and words that has been consistent through and remains characteristic of Holzer’s art.
Jenny Holzer:  Dust Paintings will be on display at Cheim & Read at 547 West 25th Street, New York, NY 10001 through October 25th, 2014.
- Arthur Ivan Bravo
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Canon EOS 5D Mark II
  • 100
  • f/11
  • 1/125th
  • 85mm

artlog:

Jenny Holzer’s ‘Dust Paintings’ at Cheim & Read

'Dust Paintings,' the exhibition of a set of recent works by American neo-conceptual artist Jenny Holzer currently on display at Cheim & Read, represents a continuation of themes and media that the artist has been concerned and involved with for years now, namely her preoccupation - a self-admitted personal interest - with the operations, consequences, and documentation of the ongoing 'War on Terror,' which perhaps not coincidentally has its beginnings in the early 2000s, roughly coinciding with a decision to utilize the texts of others as opposed to her own for the first time, and a notable return to painting.

Holzer, the first woman to represent the United States at the Venice Biennale, for winning the Golden Lion there, and for being a recipient of a variety of other major prizes and, of course, commissions, had been widely known - increasingly so - from the 70s to the 90s and beyond, for her use of LED screens and later, projections, to display text in public settings.  By many accounts, Holzer moved to text as her main medium of choice from painting while a student at the Whitney ISP program, and never looked back.  The subject matter of the texts she came up with and used varied widely, from project to project, or series to series.

Since 2004, however, Holzer has arguably been reaching back to, or at least referencing her early practice as an abstract painter, to accommodate her work with declassified and redacted documents detailing government and military activities relating to and surrounding the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq.

JH1926on09_01_2014.psd

X Conclusion, 2014, Oil on linen, 80 x 62 x 1 1/2 in.  (203.2 x 157.5 x 3.8 cm).  Photo credit:  © Jenny Holzer, member Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY.  Courtesy Cheim & Read, New York.

While previous exhibitions in New York of hers such as the thought-provokingly-titled ‘Archive’ from mid-2006 had her silkscreening on linen copies of text documents, the works in ‘Dust Paintings’ share more similarities with the even more recent ‘Endgame,’ where Holzer painted oil on linen copies of these intensely analyzed and manipulated documents.

CONCLUSION

CONCLUSION, 2014, Oil on linen, 24 x 18 1/4 x 1 1/2 in.  (61 x 46.4 x 3.8 cm).  Photo credit:  © Jenny Holzer, member Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY.  Courtesy Cheim & Read, New York.

Interestingly, some portion of the works on display at both exhibitions past and present evoke the late modern abstract sylistic characteristics of Malevich’s Suprematism and the like, with basic and gradient-colored rectangles filling in as tools of redaction against white backgrounds, selectively revealing words, and fragments of, or whole sentences every bit as provocative as in any of Holzer’s past work.

PRESENTLY IN THE UNITED STATES

PRESENTLY IN THE UNITED STATES, 2014, Oil on linen, 80 x 62 x 1 1/2 in.  (203.2 x 157.5 x 3.8 cm).  Photo credit:  © Jenny Holzer, member Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY.  Courtesy Cheim & Read, New York.

While the Suprematist-inspired works tend to be based on past intelligence reports, most of the other works are taken from the contents of a U.S. Army criminal investigation report on the death of an Afghan captive, and resemble hand-written letters and doodles whose deteriorating condition may soon make them incomprehensible.

cold water

cold water, 2013, Oil on linen, 58 x 44 x 1 1/2 in. (147.3 x 111.8 x 3.8 cm).  Photo credit:  © Jenny Holzer, member Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY.  Courtesy Cheim & Read, New York.

Although the medium has changed from LED and projection, and - something is to be said - away from technology towards the plastic arts, and the subject matter from a social context and contemporary everyday living to the specific situation of the ‘War on Terror,’ ‘Dust Paintings’ retains an ambiguous yet provocative power in utilizing text, language, and words that has been consistent through and remains characteristic of Holzer’s art.

Jenny Holzer:  Dust Paintings will be on display at Cheim & Read at 547 West 25th Street, New York, NY 10001 through October 25th, 2014.

- Arthur Ivan Bravo

Artprize 2014, ein Album auf Flickr.

Artprize 2014, ein Album auf Flickr.

omnia-est-vanitas:

Weekend spent at Art Prize acting like snobs. @jonathan.odden

omnia-est-vanitas:

Weekend spent at Art Prize acting like snobs. @jonathan.odden

heteroglossia:

Herbert Bayer, Diagram of the Field of Vision

"The right method of philosophy would be this. To say nothing except what can be said, i.e. the propositions of natural science, i.e. something that has nothing to do with philosophy: and then always when someone else wished to say something metaphysical, to demonstrate to him that he had given no meaning to certain signs in his propositions. This method would be unsatisfying to the other —he would not have the feeling that we were teaching him philosophy — but it would be the only strictly correct method. 
My propositions are elucidatory in this way: he who understands me finally recognizes them as senseless, when he has climbed out through them, on them, over them. (He must, so to speak, throw away the ladder, after he has climbed up on it.)
He must surmount these propositions; then he sees the world rightly.
Whereof one cannot speak, thereof one must be silent.”
-Wittgenstein, 6.53-7, Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus
"According to this view we could only say things about the world as a whole if we could get outside the world, if, that is to say, it ceased to be for us the whole world. … Our field of vision does not, for us, have a visual boundary, just because there is nothing outside it, and in like manner our logical world has no logical boundary because our logic nows of nothing outside it.”
-Bertrand Russell, Introduction, Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus

heteroglossia:

Herbert Bayer, Diagram of the Field of Vision

"The right method of philosophy would be this. To say nothing except what can be said, i.e. the propositions of natural science, i.e. something that has nothing to do with philosophy: and then always when someone else wished to say something metaphysical, to demonstrate to him that he had given no meaning to certain signs in his propositions. This method would be unsatisfying to the other —he would not have the feeling that we were teaching him philosophy — but it would be the only strictly correct method. 

My propositions are elucidatory in this way: he who understands me finally recognizes them as senseless, when he has climbed out through them, on them, over them. (He must, so to speak, throw away the ladder, after he has climbed up on it.)

He must surmount these propositions; then he sees the world rightly.

Whereof one cannot speak, thereof one must be silent.”

-Wittgenstein, 6.53-7, Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus

"According to this view we could only say things about the world as a whole if we could get outside the world, if, that is to say, it ceased to be for us the whole world. … Our field of vision does not, for us, have a visual boundary, just because there is nothing outside it, and in like manner our logical world has no logical boundary because our logic nows of nothing outside it.

-Bertrand Russell, Introduction, Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus

FOR ELIOT’S BIRTHDAY, SOME RANDOM ESSAYS:
T. S. ELIOT “HAMLET AND HIS PROBLEMS” (1919)
T. S. ELIOT “THE METAPHYSICAL POETS” (1922)
AND, BECAUSE IT SHOULD ALWAYS BE REMEMBERED, THIS TOO:
BIGOTRY IN MOTION

FOR ELIOT’S BIRTHDAY, SOME RANDOM ESSAYS:

T. S. ELIOT “HAMLET AND HIS PROBLEMS” (1919)

T. S. ELIOT “THE METAPHYSICAL POETS” (1922)

AND, BECAUSE IT SHOULD ALWAYS BE REMEMBERED, THIS TOO:

BIGOTRY IN MOTION